Sunday, June 8, 2014

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - June 8, 2014


To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page.

June 8, 2014





The "Royal We" has returned? It hasn't been used since the very first Latin Tweet by Pope Francis (or, more accurately, his Latin translation team).

Perhaps we could understand hortamur to mean "We (Pope Francis, Mahmoud Abbas, and Shimon Peres) urge"...

But that doesn't seem the most likely interpretation. The English says "I ask." The Latin says "We urge."

And hortamur is two characters longer than hortor, something to avoid in Twitter.

Literal translation of the Latin: We urge all people of good will in this day itself (to) pray with us for peace from God in the Middle East.

Here's how the Latin works.


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Universos
all
acc. pl. masc. adj.;
universus, universa, universum; modifies homines
hortamur
We urge
1st pers. pl. pres. ind. deponent verb
hortor, hortari, hortatum
bonae
of good
gen. sing. fem. adj.
bonus, bona, bonum; modifies voluntatis
voluntatis
(of) will
gen. sing. fem. noun
voluntas, voluntatis
homines
people
acc. pl. masc. noun
homo, hominis; obj. of hortamur
hoc
in this
abl. sing. masc. adj.
hic, haec, hoc; modifies die
ipso
itself
abl. sing. masc. adj.
ipse, ipsa, ipsum; modifies die
die
day
abl. sing. masc. noun
ablative of time
pacem
peace
acc. sing. fem. noun
pax, pacis; obj. of petant
in
in
Prep. + abl.

Medio
the Middle
abl. sing. masc. adj.
medius, media, medium; modifies Oriente
Oriente
East
abl. sing. masc. noun
oriens, orientis
nobiscum
with us
abl. pl. pronoun
nos, nostri + cum enclitic
a
from
Prep. + abl.

Deo
God
abl. sing. masc. noun
Deus, Dei
petant
may (they) pray for / seek
3rd pers. pl. pres. act. subj.
peto, petere, petivi, petitum
 

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